10 ways parents can boost children’s early literacy development

Classroom teachers and administrators know that family involvement in early childhood education can significantly influence early literacy development, early language development, and overall school success. As with most educational endeavors, implementing best practices can increase results. So, we gathered 10 research-based tips from previous blog posts for teachers to share with parents. These tips can increase . . . → Read More: 10 ways parents can boost children’s early literacy development

Importance of including a literacy-rich home environment for children with Down syndrome

Children of all abilities greatly benefit from shared storybook reading at home and access to a literacy-rich home environment. The doctor of all children’s books—Dr. Seuss—expresses it this way: “The more you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.” Reading opens up the world to children . . . → Read More: Importance of including a literacy-rich home environment for children with Down syndrome

Parent involvement in early childhood education that grows literacy skills

Without a doubt, a parent is a child’s first and best teacher. Unfortunately, unlike many early childhood educators who receive professional development for teachers throughout the year, parents generally partake in on-the-job training. Educators are uniquely suited to help support a parent’s role as teacher by sharing insights on how children learn best. Not surprisingly, research . . . → Read More: Parent involvement in early childhood education that grows literacy skills

Family involvement in early childhood education influences emergent literacy skills

Family involvement in education starts long before formal school actually begins. In fact, family involvement in education starts at birth. As a child’s first and most important teacher, parents are uniquely suited to prepare a child for later academic success, including early literacy and language development.

Early childhood research continues to show the myriad educational benefits of . . . → Read More: Family involvement in early childhood education influences emergent literacy skills

Pre-K special education curriculum can increase early literacy skills for children with special needs

Much has been written and discussed about the positive impact of enrollment in a quality Pre-K program, especially on those children deemed “at-risk students.” A pair of Georgetown University professors recently published a study in the Exceptional Children Journal that features the results of a study evaluating the effects of a school-based Pre-K program for . . . → Read More: Pre-K special education curriculum can increase early literacy skills for children with special needs

12 reasons to start planning now for students’ reading next summer

For many teachers in public schools, summer vacations will draw to a close soon. All those Boards created on Pinterest, webinars attended, or books read will be put into practice when new students enter the classroom. And teachers will pour their hearts into them all—helping to set their students on a path of future academic—and life—success.

As . . . → Read More: 12 reasons to start planning now for students’ reading next summer

4 musical activities that support phonological awareness

Edited excerpt from Music and…Reading

Phonological awareness helps children recognize that words are comprised of a variety of sounds. Some researchers believe that a child’s level of phonological awareness when they begin school is the key to learning how to read. Try these activities in your early childhood classroom or share them with parents as a way . . . → Read More: 4 musical activities that support phonological awareness

2 literacy activities that use music to teach comprehension

Edited excerpt from Music and…Reading.

Early childhood literacy research shows that children who participate in music classes are more likely to score higher on tests of reading comprehension than other children. Try these two literacy activities in the classroom or share them with parents as a way to grow comprehension skills in young children.

2 literacy activities that . . . → Read More: 2 literacy activities that use music to teach comprehension

Steps to phonological awareness

Edited excerpt from Music and…Reading

Long before children can tell someone that the magnetic letter “m” on the refrigerator stands for the /m/ sound, they are building sensitivity to the sounds of spoken language. Researchers call this phonological awareness. Phonological awareness is a very important step in the journey to learning to read. In fact, some . . . → Read More: Steps to phonological awareness

Listening abilities provide a foundation for reading and language development

Edited excerpt from Music and…Reading

Children spend up to 75 percent of their classroom time learning through listening. The importance of being a good listener—a skilled listener—can hardly be overrated in today’s culture. The ability to listen skillfully, in fact, provides a foundation for all aspects of reading and language development—but according to experts, while skillful listening . . . → Read More: Listening abilities provide a foundation for reading and language development