12 reasons to start planning now for students’ reading next summer

For many teachers in public schools, summer vacations will draw to a close soon. All those Boards created on Pinterest, webinars attended, or books read will be put into practice when new students enter the classroom. And teachers will pour their hearts into them all—helping to set their students on a path of future academic—and life—success.

As . . . → Read More: 12 reasons to start planning now for students’ reading next summer

Listening abilities provide a foundation for reading and language development

Edited excerpt from Music and…Reading

Children spend up to 75 percent of their classroom time learning through listening. The importance of being a good listener—a skilled listener—can hardly be overrated in today’s culture. The ability to listen skillfully, in fact, provides a foundation for all aspects of reading and language development—but according to experts, while skillful listening . . . → Read More: Listening abilities provide a foundation for reading and language development

3 aspects of self-regulation that matter most in the early childhood classroom

Eventually, most early childhood educators utter at least one of these common phrases: “Hold your horses,” “Hands to yourself,” “Wait your turn,” “Raise your hand first,” and “Be patient.” Sometimes teaching a room full of young children can feel a bit like being a member of the Self-Regulation Police.

Preschoolers’ self-regulation abilities have been linked to literacy, . . . → Read More: 3 aspects of self-regulation that matter most in the early childhood classroom

Making music together increases children’s empathy

Children who participate in music classes from a young age experience many positive side effects, including

increased reading comprehension scores
better social skills
improved math abilities
enriched early writing and print awareness

Now, research currently under review for publication even shows that music can help children learn empathy. Led by Tal-Chen Rabinowitchof, a doctoral student at the University of Cambridge, . . . → Read More: Making music together increases children’s empathy

Music instruction linked to increased reading comprehension abilities

Edited Excerpt from Music and…Reading

For children, all the work they put into learning to decipher the code that makes up written words finally pays off when they have the “aha” moment that the squiggly lines on their bedroom door spell their name. The whole point of bothering to learn to read, of course, is to understand . . . → Read More: Music instruction linked to increased reading comprehension abilities

Preschoolers learn from explaining

Based on research published in the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, it may be time to change an old familiar Chinese proverb to read: “Give a child the answer and you help him for a day. Let a child explain the answer and you provide a lifetime of learning.”

A research team led by Bethany Rittle-Johnson, PhD, . . . → Read More: Preschoolers learn from explaining

TV negatively impacts communication between parents and young children

Do you remember the Oompa-Loompas from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl? We don’t normally think about the Oompa-Loompas as early literacy advocates, but long before the American Academy of Pediatrics set the latest guidelines for TV viewing, these characters pleaded: “So please, oh PLEASE, we beg, we pray, Go throw your TV set . . . → Read More: TV negatively impacts communication between parents and young children

Children with autism look away from faces when thinking

During a conversation, making eye contact with another person indicates respect, interest, and understanding. When processing a difficult question or trying to recall a memory, however, a typically developing person generally looks away. For a child with autism, the tendency to avoid eye contact is one of the most common traits. Now new research published in . . . → Read More: Children with autism look away from faces when thinking

Childhood self-control predicts adulthood health and wealth

Self-regulation can lead to early academic success. In fact, one study even showed that self-regulation abilities may be even more important than intelligence for learning emerging math and literacy in Kindergarten. Now a new study led by researchers at Duke University indicates that childhood self-control abilities can predict adulthood health and wealth.

In collaboration with teachers, parents, . . . → Read More: Childhood self-control predicts adulthood health and wealth

Parents who play with their toddler can impact 5th grade reading and math abilities

In a recent issue of Family Science, results from a 15-year research study give even more reasons why parents should actively play with their young children. By following 229 families enrolled in the U.S. Head Start Research and Evaluation Project, researchers identified that parents who actively engage in specific types of play with their toddlers . . . → Read More: Parents who play with their toddler can impact 5th grade reading and math abilities